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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
time, we're getting a look at what the white house is offering to stop the fiscal cliff stalemate. drastic mandatory tax hikes and spending cuts will kick in with the new year unless the white house and the republicans can reach a deal. for weeks, gop lawmakers have said we're just waiting for the white house to give details, specifics, some numbers. well, tonight that's happened. the white house is calling their bluff and they've laid out how they want to cut the debt. jessica yellin is over at the white house for us tonight with new developments. jessica, what are the specifics of this offer tonight? >> reporter: hi, wolf. according to senior officials on both sides of the aisle, the president is asking for $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that includes raising taxes for families who make $250,000 or more. you'll recognize that as a pledge from his campaign. and it also includes limiting deductions and loopholes as well as other changes to capital gains and dividends taxes. well, that is the headline for republicans, wolf, who say it is far more money in tax rates than they ever expe
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)